fixed : using a Nintendo Switch on an HD-ready TV without HDMI-input

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the solution outlined below is your best option for all devices that have an HDMI port as their best or only video output, including (but not limited to) gaming consoles like Playstation PS3/PS4, Xbox 360 & Xbox One, Nintendo Switch & Wii-U and all versions of AppleTV

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Question :

I just bought a Nintendo Switch gaming console and I want to connect it to my old flatscreen 26″ LCD-TV that doesn’t have HDMI.

Even tough the TV is able to display HD-video up to 1080i and computer-display resolutions up to 1280×768 pixels at 60Hz, it does not have an HDMI input, neither a digital audio input (a.k.a. “Toslink”).

The only input options are :

– DVI digital video + 3.5mm (a.k.a. “jack”) analog audio

– VGA analog video + 3.5mm (a.k.a. “jack”) analog audio

– Component YPbPr analog video + stereo analog audio (5 plugs, a.k.a. “RCA” or “tulip”)

– S-video analog video (S-video plug) + stereo analog audio (a.k.a. “RCA” or “tulip”)

– SCART analog video + audio (SCART plug)

How do I connect my Nintendo Switch to this TV-set ?

 

Answer :

Even though it might seem the most obvious to connect the Nintendo Switch’s HDMI-output to the TV’s DVI-input, since HDMI and DVI are 100% video-compatible, this comes with 2 problems :

– DVI has no audio, so you will have to connect the audio separately ; in this case that would require a DAC (digital-analog-converter) for your audio since your TV has no digital audio input

– DVI does not support HDCP-encryption as HDMI does, so any ‘copyright-protected’ HDMI content will be blocked when connected to DVI…

So… do not try to use the DVI-input, but use the Component YPbPr connection, especially since the digital-to-analog video-conversion gets rid of the HDCP-limitations for you also !

This converter cable is the most elegant option that will do the trick for you :

LogiLink HDMI to YPbPr & Audio Converter Cable (2m) [Amazon.com]

LogiLink HDMI to YPbPr & Audio Converter Cable (2m) [Amazon.co.uk]

LogiLink HDMI to YPbPr & Audio Converter Cable (2m) [Amazon.de]

…it turns out that the HDMI-output of the Nintendo Switch is supplying enough power to  power the built-in converter, so you don’t need to connect the USB-power cable.

Donate Button (MacManusNL)

 

If you have an HD-Ready flatscreen TV and you want to connect an AppleTV or a gaming console (Nintendo Wii-U, Nintendo Switch, Playstation PS3/PS4, Xbox One or Xbox 360), your best option is to use the HDMI-to-YPbPr converter-cable mentioned above.

But… in some cases these might also be interesting :

An HDMI-to-VGA&stereo converter-cable :

LogiLink HDMI to VGA & Audio Converter Cable (2m) [Amazon.com]

LogiLink HDMI to VGA & Audio Converter Cable (2m) [Amazon.co.uk]

LogiLink HDMI to VGA & Audio Converter Cable (2m) [Amazon.de]

An HDMI-to-HDMI&stereo converter-cable : [so this splits the audio from the HDMI-video signal and converts it into a separate analog stereo (2x RCA) signal, but beware that the output video signal is 720p, 1080p and 1080i only, which is problematic for most HD-ready flatscreen TVs, especially when combined with an HDMI-to-DVI converter] :

LogiLink HDMI to HDMI & Analog Audio Converter Cable (2m) [Amazon.co.uk]

LogiLink HDMI to HDMI & Analog Audio Converter Cable (2m) [Amazon.de]

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test : Albert Heijn (a.k.a. iClever) Apple-imitation bluetooth keyboard

The official Apple Bluetooth keyboard looks really cool and works smoothly, but it’s expensive… a little too expensive for most purposes people say…

Of course there have been lots of alternative wireless keyboards available, but none really got the looks of a genuine Apple one (for some that is a must). That’s probably the reason why some unknown asian company has made an un-branded ‘white label’ all-plastic knock-off imitation which – at first glance – looks nearly identical to the aluminum Apple bluetooth keyboard. This imitation keyboard is available under a wide variety of brands, like the iClever-brand in most of the world, but for instance also under the dutch supermarket Albert Heijn’s own private label.

The iClever wireless keyboard can be purchased from Amazon.com, Amazon.co.uk when you want a regular QWERTY-layout, and from Amazon.de if you want a german QWERTZ-layout.

Anyway, the main question is : is it any good ?

Simple answer : Yes, but…

Let me clarify : Yes, it’s a really nice keyboard to have and to use, with an interesting price tag below € 25 (sometimes even in the € 15 region). But it comes with a few flaws, so to quickly round up the verdict :

It’s an ideal low-budget wireless secondary keyboard for use with any Apple device that has a primary keyboard built-in.

To be more specific :

it’s a great low-budget wireless keyboard for use with an AppleTV

it’s a very nice low-budget wireless keyboard for use with an iPad or iPhone (but there might be quite a few handier options, like a iPad-cover with built-in keyboard)

it’s a good low-budget secondary keyboard for use with a MacBook (Air/Pro), for instance when your MacBook is closed and connected to a bigger screen

it’s a handy, but slightly tricky keyboard for use with a Mac mini, iMac or Mac Pro (for these Macs I would advice to keep an regular USB-keyboard at hand for emergencies)

Why ?

NOTE (*) : the top-left key (the one with the open square) on this keyboard is the [HOME] key

– it doesn’t have an Escape (ESC) key, so when any program on your Mac hangs, you will not be able to Force Quit the application with this keyboard…

UPDATE (*) : to [ESC], use this key-combo : [FN] + [HOME]

so, to Force Quit, use this key-combo : [CMD] + [ALT] + [FN] + [HOME]

– it doesn’t have an Eject key for the DVD/CD-drive, so when this is your only keyboard, you will not be able to get any CD or DVD out of your Mac easily… you will need to do the annoying drag-to-the-trash move using your mouse each and every time…

UPDATE (*) : to Eject, use this key (not a key-combo) : [F5]

– it doesn’t have any option to set the (energy saving) auto-disconnect function to a longer interval… which means that when your Mac also goes into (energy saving) sleep mode, the  keyboard has a lot of problems waking your Mac… (e.g. you will need to press any button for a prolonged time, but doing so also makes your Mac see that as input for any application that was still open… you might mess up your open Word-document with an enormous line of spaces in doing so…)

UPDATE (*) : to Wake From Sleep, use this key (not a key combo) : [HOME]

– the keyboard is often recognized too late when starting up your Mac, so you can’t use it to type your password during login, so you can’t start using your Mac… this is possibly only a problem for older Macs and/or older versions of MacOSX, but still…

I have tested this keyboard with Apple devices only, so I can’t tell about the compatibility with other devices, but I would think it will be similar : good to great for use with smartphones and tablets running Android and Windows Mobile, but rather troublesome for use with a Windows-PC…

😉

(*) special thanks to Arjan de Boer for these not-so-obvious, but very useful key-combos

fixed : setup LogiLink WL0083 as WiFi-to-ethernet-bridge

Question :

I have a Philips BluRay player which has the option to connect to the internet (for things like YouTube and Picasa), which I think would be interesting to every once in a while.  The BluRay player has two options to connect to the internet, either using an ethernet network cable or using the special Philips WiFi-to-USB-dongle that is very expensive.

Problem is the BluRay player is next to my TV (and my AppleTV), but I do not have an ethernet cable connection there, only WiFi… (and my AppleTV cannot share it’s WiFi connection through it’s ethernet port…)

My first thought was to use an Apple AirPort Express and connect it to the BluRay player’s ethernet-port to use it as a WiFi/AirPort-client… but since I do not have an AirPort Express (yet), buying one would even be a more expensive option than buying the official Philips WiFi-to-USB-dongle…

On the other hand… I do happen to have a mini/portable WiFi-router (a LogiLink WL0083) lying around, which should be able to act as a WiFi-to-ethernet-bridge also…

But… even after several tries, I did not succeed in setting the WL0083 up properly…

Any idea how that should be done ?

Answer :

Yes !

Actually it’s rather simple, you just have to setup the LogiLink WL0083 as “Client+AP” and use the setup-wizard of the web-interface, but there are 3 things to know :

-1- the default IP-address of the LogiLink WL0083 is 192.168.2.1 so you need to be sure that the network you want it to connect to does not use the 192.168.2.0 to 192.168.2.255 range of IP-adresses (so you might have to reconfigure your ‘entire’ network to use the 192.168.3.1 to 192.168.3.255 range…)

-2- to make it a “Client only” instead of a “Client+AP”, you should set SSID broadcast to “Hidden” and leave the additional (extender) SSID in default “Logilink” and “Disabled”

-3- and… when finishing up, do not forget to change the IP-address of your Mac’s WiFi and ethernet connection back to “DHCP”

in a step-by-step guide, that would be :

– make sure your WiFi network is not using the 192.168.2.0 to 192.168.2.255 range of IP-adresses (if it does, reconfigure your network router to use another range of IP addresses, and reconfigure all clients in your network that use Static IP addresses)

– then unplug your ethernet cable from your regular network

– disconnect from your regular WiFi/AirPort-network

– connect the LogiLink WL0083 to your Mac using an ethernet cable, and connect it’s USB-cable to a powered USB-port (e.g. on your Mac)

– then press the small “WPS/Reset”-button on the WL0083 for about 5 seconds (to reset it)

– then, on your Mac, go to Apple Menu (Apple icon top-left on the screen) –> System Preferences –> Network –> Ethernet and change it to “Using DHCP with manual address” and type the IP-address 192.168.2.100 in the input field

– then open Safari and type 192.168.2.1 into the URL-field ; for User Name and Password type “admin” (both the same)

– now the LogiLink web interface should open

– click on the “Client+AP” tab, then “Setup Wizard” on the left, followed by “Next” on the left

– on the next screen, start by clicking on the “Scan”-button, and wait for the list of SSIDs of local WiFi/AirPort-networks to appear

– then select your WiFi/AirPort-network from the list

– everything will then be automatically filled out, apart from “Pass Phrase:”, there you should type your WiFi/AirPort-password

– then click “Next”

– in the “Wireless Basic Settings”-screen that opens, set “Network Mode” to “11b/g/n mixed mode”, leave “SSID” as it is (probably “Logilink”), set “Broadcast SSID” to “Disable” and leave the rest as it is automatically set

– then click “Next”

– in the “Wireless Security Settings”-screen that opens, set “Security Mode” to “Disable”, and leave the rest as it is

– then click “Next”

– in the next screen click “Apply” and the WL0083 will reboot

– then, on your Mac, make sure that you are NOT connected to a WiFi/AirPort-network

– then go to Apple Menu –> System Preferences –> Network –> Ethernet and change it to “Using DHCP”

– then, in Safari, manually type the URL of any existing website that you do not often visit (e.g. the website of the city you live in) and see if it loads, to check if the WL0083 is properly configured as a WiFi-client on your network

– then disconnect the LogiLink WL0083’s ethernet and USB cable from your Mac

– so, go over to your BluRay player, and connect the LogiLink WL0083’s ethernet cable to it and connect the USB cable to a powered USB-port (or USB-poweradapter)

– now try and see if your BluRay player can use it’s internet services

– if your BluRay player needs any additional configuration, just set it to “ethernet” and “DHCP”

Enjoy !

Donate Button (MacManusNL)

Note #1 : the LogiLink WL0083 supports WiFi-N only at 150Mbps speed, even though the normal maximum speed of WiFi-N is 300Mbps (just like Apple’s implementation of WiFi-N in AirPort), most of the time you will probably not notice any decline in quality, but you might if you’re a heavy user…

Note #2 : if you want to adjust something small on your LogiLink WL0083 after you’ve configured it, you just need to temporarily switch your ethernet-connection from “Using DHCP” to “Using DHCP with manual address” and 192.168.2.100 as the actual IP-address ; then you can login to the LogiLink web-interface at the 192.168.2.1 URL (and do not forget to change back to “Using DHCP” afterwards)

fixed : using the AppleTV on an HD-ready TV without HDMI-input

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update : this solution should also work for the new 4th generation AppleTV (2015)

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Question :

I just bought an AppleTV 3 and I want to connect it to my flatscreen 26″ LCD-TV, a MyCom MC2600LT (it’s actually a rebranded/white-label DT-3003X which has internationally also been sold under the Daewoo and Grundig Xentia brand, and probably more).

Even tough the TV is able to display HD-video up to 1080i and computer-display resolutions up to 1280×768 pixels at 60Hz, it does not have an HDMI input, neither a digital audio input (a.k.a. “Toslink”).

The only input options are :

– DVI digital video + 3.5mm (a.k.a. “jack”) analog audio

– VGA analog video + 3.5mm (a.k.a. “jack”) analog audio

– Component YPbPr analog video + stereo analog audio (5 plugs, a.k.a. “RCA” or “tulip”)

– S-video analog video (S-video plug) + stereo analog audio (a.k.a. “RCA” or “tulip”)

– SCART analog video + audio (SCART plug)

How do I connect my AppleTV 3 to this TV-set ?

 

Answer :

Even though it might seem the most obvious to connect the AppleTV’s HDMI-output to the TV’s DVI-input, since HDMI and DVI are 100% video-compatible, this comes with 2 problems :

– DVI has no audio, so you will have to connect the audio separately ; in this case that would require a DAC (digital-analog-converter) for your audio since your TV has no digital audio input

– DVI does not support HDCP-encryption as HDMI does, so any ‘copyright-protected’ HDMI content will be blocked when connected to DVI…

So… do not try to use the DVI-input, but use the Component YPbPr connection, especially since the digital-to-analog video-conversion gets rid of the HDCP-limitations for you also !

This converter cable is the most elegant option that will do the trick for you :

LogiLink HDMI to YPbPr & Audio Converter Cable (2m) [Amazon.com]

LogiLink HDMI to YPbPr & Audio Converter Cable (2m) [Amazon.co.uk]

LogiLink HDMI to YPbPr & Audio Converter Cable (2m) [Amazon.de]

…it turns out that the HDMI-output of the AppleTV 3 is supplying enough power to  power the built-in converter, so you don’t need to connect the USB-power cable.

Donate Button (MacManusNL)

For anyone interested, here’s a link to the Dutch manual of the 26″ MyCom LCD-TV MC2600LT (a.k.a. DT-3003X) :

manual MyCom LCD tv

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If you have an HD-Ready flatscreen TV and you want to connect an AppleTV, your best option is to use the HDMI-to-YPbPr converter-cable mentioned above.

But… in some cases these might also be interesting :

An HDMI-to-VGA&stereo converter-cable :

LogiLink HDMI to VGA & Audio Converter Cable (2m) [Amazon.com]

LogiLink HDMI to VGA & Audio Converter Cable (2m) [Amazon.co.uk]

LogiLink HDMI to VGA & Audio Converter Cable (2m) [Amazon.de]

An HDMI-to-HDMI&stereo converter-cable : [so this splits the audio from the HDMI-video signal and converts it into a separate analog stereo (2x RCA) signal, but beware that the output video signal is 720p, 1080p and 1080i only, which is problematic for most HD-ready flatscreen TVs, especially when combined with an HDMI-to-DVI converter] :

LogiLink HDMI to HDMI & Analog Audio Converter Cable (2m) [Amazon.co.uk]

LogiLink HDMI to HDMI & Analog Audio Converter Cable (2m) [Amazon.de]