fixed : quickly free up disk space on MacOSX 10.6.8 Snow Leopard

Question :

My son alarmed me today that his ‘good old’ Mac gives a “your startup disk is full” warning at startup. He has our old Intel CoreDuo MacBook that can only run MacOSX 10.6.8 Snow Leopard.

What is the easiest way to free up the much needed harddrive space ?

 

Answer :

There  are various programs that can do the job of identifying which files are cluttering your harddrive and deleting unneeded files.

If you have an older Mac that can not run the latest version of OSX, I would suggest using the DiskWave application to do so, because of 4 reasons :

  1. DiskWave is very small in size (only about 1MB), so you can even install and run it on an extremely full harddrive
  2. DiskWave is able to manage external drives, so you can also run it on a newer/faster/other Mac and connect the problematic Mac as an external drive [ in so called “Target Mode” by restarting the problematic Mac with the T-key pressed and connecting it to the other Mac with a FireWire-cable ]
  3. DiskWave is available for various old versions of MacOSX
  4. DiskWave is FREE to download and use

Using DiskWave is rather straight forward. A quick instruction video can be seen here :

DiskWave instruction video

Getting hold of DiskWave might be problematic however, as the developer’s website (Aymeric Barthe) seems to be down :

Aymeric Barthe website

And the DiskWave app is NOT available from the Mac AppStore either… [ beware not too be fooled into thinking it’s the same as the iDiskWave app ! ]

A secondary problem is that the best available version (DiskWave 0.4) does not support any pre-Core2Duo. For now, all (older) versions of DiskWave can be downloaded here :

download any DiskWave version at Mac.FileHorse.com

Note that DiskWave 0.3.2 is the latest version of DiskWave to run on PowerPC (G3/G4/G5) Macs and 1st generation Intel (CoreSolo and CoreDuo) Macs.

And if those links stop working also, you can download DiskWave 0.3.2 here :

DiskWave_0.3.2

[ !! after downloading, replace the .doc file-extension by .dmg to get the installer !! ]

Enjoy !

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fixed : use internal SATA hard drive in LaCie “Mac mini”-form factor housing

Question :

I have an old, square-ish Mac mini (2005 through June 2010), which back-ups to a LaCie FireWire 400 harddrive with the same square-ish form-factor. This morning however, the harddrive inside the LaCie mini has died…

I could just get a completely new external hard drive (with a different design) for my backups now, but I really like the square-ish housing of the LaCie mini together with the Mac mini, so I’ve decided to replace the internal hard disk.

However, it turns out that the internal hard disk of the LaCie mini is an IDE (ATA) hard disk, which are increasingly harder to get than the current Serial-ATA (SATA) hard disks, and generally even more expensive.

Is there a way to use an internal SATA hard disk inside the LaCie mini housing ?

Answer :

Yes, there is.

What you need is this :

– a high-capacity internal 2.5″ laptop SATA harddisk (it is possible using a 3.5″ desktop SATA harddisk, but that is not recommended as explained at the bottom of this post), like a Hitachi TravelStar 1TB SATA harddisk

– a 2.5″ to 3.5″ bay converter-frame, or preferably just the Digitus 2.5″ to 3.5″ bay converter-brackets or alike

– a Wintech SAK-65 bi-directional SATA-to-IDE converter (because of the limited space inside the LaCie mini housing, most other IDE-to-SATA converters will be too bulky too fit in one direction or another)

Note : the Wintech SAK-65 comes with all cables to connect a SATA hard disk to the LaCie mini IDE/ATA-internal

When you have all these parts, the build-in is rather straight forward, especially if you use the manual provided with the Wintech Converter. In short :

1- unplug the LaCie mini form the power and FireWire cables, then remove the white plastic triangular feet from the LaCie mini housing (the are sticker-type feet, so temporarily stick them to a clean smooth surface to store) and unscrew the  screws you find beneath them

2- gently open the housing, unscrew the broken iDE/ATA-hard drive, and take it out

3- gently disconnect the ATA-to-ATA cable, and take it out also

4- then put the new SATA-hard drive in and screw it into place

5- then connect the Wintech converter as outlined in the instruction manual (so, set it’s switch to “Device” and do not forget to connect it to the power using the provided Molex extension cable that includes an extra power connector for the Wintech connector)

6- then connect both Wentronic cables to the hard disk on one end and on the other end to the Molex cable and the Wintech connector

7- then make sure the Wintech connector is slightly twisted in such a way that it is a flat on the hard drive as possible and gently close up the housing (don’t forget the plastic feet)

8- reconnect the power and FireWire cables, and then the LaCie mini will be recognized as and ‘unreadable’ drive by your Mac mini

9- use OSX’s Disk Utility-app to format the drive to “Mac Journaled” format, and it will appear as a healthy drive on your Mac (ready for use, for Time Machine backups or alike)

That’s it

😉

—————————

If you really want to build a 3.5″ SATA harddisk into this LaCie mini housing, it can be done, but it will fit so extremely tight that it comes with some extra things you need to address :

1- you will NOT need the 2.5″ to 3.5″ converter brackets

2- the provided cables will not fit in such a way that the housing can be properly rebuilt, so you will also need :

– a Wentronic 4p-Molex-to-angled-15p-SATA power cable (none of the cables with a regular straight SATA-connector will fit, and even most of the angled SATA-connectors will be too bulky too fit, and even this one leaves less than a mm of room for the housing) to extend the “Molex-with-an-extra-power-wire-for-the-converter”-cable

– a Wentronic SATA-to-angled-SATA data cable (most of the other angled-SATA connectors will be too bulky, but the Belkin SATA-to-angled-SATA data cable will fit as well), but you will even have to strip a little extra off the angled connector to enable the cable to make a ‘near-360’-corner

3- the Wintech SAK-65 bi-directional SATA-to-IDE converter needs to be used stripped of it’s plastic housing as it’s too bulky, and you will need to extend the IDE Master/Slave-cable (the wide and flat cable that looks like a lot of tiny wires next to each other) by opening the connection on the converter and putting the original one from the LaCie mini housing in it’s place (after having taken off the connector of that one also)

4- make sure you don’t adjust the 3.5″ SATA harddrive using the screws, just put it ‘on the floor plate'(to make a little extra space)

5- …and then you will have to puzzle quite a bit to fit all of that into the housing

As mentioned before : using a 2.5″ SATA harddrive is far more convenient and straight forward !

Whichever solution you choose :

Enjoy !

😉

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info : iCloud Photo Stream on OSX 10.6 Snow Leopard

Question :

I have set up iCloud Photostream on my iPhone and/or iPad to automatically upload my pictures to iCloud, but my Mac is a Core Duo Intel-Mac, which can only run MacOSX 10.6 Snow Leopard…

…is there any way to get my photos ‘Photostream-like’ onto my Snow Leopard Mac automatically ?

Answer :

The requirement for iCloud Photostream-compatibility on a Mac is iPhoto 9.2.3 (from iLife ’11). But even though it is possible to install iPhoto 9.2.3 on a Mac running OSX 10.6.8 Snow Leopard, iPhoto will only show the Photostream option if you are on a Mac running 10.7 Lion or 10.8 Mountain Lion.

At this moment your options are :

1- use the workaround using the Eye-Fi app, as previously outlined here :

https://macmanus.nl/2012/07/28/fixed-icloud-photostream-from-business-iphone-to-family-mac/

2- use the rather costly and time-consuming setup of iCloud Control Panel for Windows on a virtual Windows-installation on your Mac [ see below for details ]

3- turn the iCloud control Panel for Windows into a OSX-app by putting it inside a (Windows Vista-compatible) Wine-wrapper [ this is a programmer-only option, which needs some (a lot of ?) debugging ; I’ve done various attempts myself, but haven’t got it working yet… help is welcome ]

4- use Dropbox (or alike) to bypass Photo Stream completely

…and a few less satisfying options :

5- wait for Apple to upgrade iPhoto and MacOSX 10.6 with support for Photo Stream [ if ever… the long awaited – but not yet (if ever) – released MacOSX 10.6.9 is/was said to bring Photostream-compatibility to Snow Leopard… but chances on that are fading day-by-day…]

6- upgrade to a new Mac [ sounds like “you’re busted” right ? ]

—- UPDATE —–

some new options have emerged :

7- get iPhoto for iOS and create a Journal that you publish online (on an iCloud webpage), from there you can export to iTunes ; more info on this can be found here :

http://help.apple.com/iphoto/ipad/1.0/#blnkaf3ef70a

8- in the iOS Photos app, create a secondary Photo Stream (a.k.a. “Shared Photo Stream”) that you publish online (on an iCloud webpage), from there you can import them on your Mac ;  more info on this can be found here :

http://support.apple.com/kb/TS4379

 

——————————————————————————–

INFO ON SETTING UP THE iCloud Control Panel for Windows ON A MAC :

Apple has released an iCloud Control Panel 2.0 for Windows Vista and Windows 7 (iCloud Control Panel 1.0 was for Windows XP also).

And since MacOSX 10.6 Snow Leopard can run OSX and Windows side-by-side, using virtualization, it is possible to set Photostream up on a Snow Leopard Mac…

Like this :

– install virtualization software (on OSX)

– install Windows (on a virtual machine in the vritualization software)

– register Windows (else you won’t be able to run it in the long run)

– install iCloud Control Panel for Windows (on Windows)

– setup iCloud Control Panel to download iCloud’s Photostream to a shared Mac&Windows-folder (on Windows)

– setup iPhoto (on MacOSX) to auto-import photos from the shared Mac&Windows-folder

…but it is both time-consuming and expensive, since you will need :

– at least 10GB of free harddisk space (on top of the 25% or more free hard disk space needed for MacOSX to run properly)

– virtualization software like Parallels, VM Ware Fusion (both rather expensive if you’ll only use it for iCloud Photostream) or Sun/Oracle’s FREE VirtualBox for OSX :

https://www.virtualbox.org/wiki/Downloads

– Windows Vista or Windows 7 with an official registration ;  which is NOT free, but you might have it lying around from an old unused PC…

(if you only have an official Windows XP lying around, you can either try to use the older WinXP-compatible version of iCloud Control Panel for Windows)

…or you can try upgrading to Windows 8, which is ‘relatively cheap’ until (‘only’ $40 or €30, but you will need a genuine Windows XP, Vista of & license…)

http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows/buy?ocid=GA8_O_WOL_Hero_Home_FPP_Null

http://windows.microsoft.com/nl-NL/windows/buy?ocid=GA8_O_WOL_Hero_Home_FPP_Null

WARNING : iCloud Control Panel 2.0 for Windows is officially not supporting Windows 8 yet… (but it’s expected to run anyway…)

– and last but not least : iCloud Control Panel for Windows version 2 :

http://support.apple.com/kb/DL1455

…or if you’re looking for the iCloud Control Panel that also runs on Windows XP :

http://icloud-control-panel.nl.softonic.com/download

…or you can try to make the latest iCloud Control Panel XP-compatible by :

– unRAR the iCloudSetup.exe using any un-archiver like RAR, UnArchiver or

– open iCloud.msi in Textedit (on OSX)

– search very occurrence of “Version>=600” and change it to “Version>=200”

– save and make sure the file-extention is back to .msi (adjust it in the finder if needed)

– run the iCloud.msi in Windows XP

So… as mentioned before : it is possible to ‘tap’ (kind of) your iCloud Photostream to your OSX 10.6 Snow Leopard Mac… but… it’s costly and time-consuming to set it up…

NOTE :

as mentioned before : I’ve tried to make an ‘OSX-app’ by putting the iCloud Control Panel for Windows in a stand-alone Wine-wrapper, but despite various attempts I haven’t got that one working yet… (any help on this is welcome)

info : get iCloud on the officially unsupported OSX Snow Leopard

Question :

I have a perfectly running ‘early’ Intel-Mac, that only has a Core Duo processor, not a Core 2 Duo (or newer), so I can’t upgrade to OSX 10.7 “Lion”. I’m ‘happily stuck’ with OSX 10.6 “Snow Leopard”. But… as MobileMe services are permanently stopping within a week, and I don’t have the budget to buy a new Mac I can’t upgrade to iCloud : What can I do ?

Answer :

————- UPDATE ————-

YES ! MacOSX 10.6 Snow Leopard can sync to iCloud

detailed instructions on how to set it up can be found in my other post here :

fixed : get iCloud on the officially unsupported OSX Snow Leopard – sync works !

————- ORIGINAL ANSWER ————-

For people like you, Apple was rumored to implement iCloud compatibility in OSX 10.6.9 about a year ago… but to this date, OSX 10.6.8 is still the newest version of OSX 10.6 “Snow Leopard”…

Based on my good experience with getting iCloud syncing running on the officially unsupported iPhone 3G, one would expect to be able to get a similar solution running on OSX 10.6 “Snow Leopard” also…

…that turns out to be a little more complicated though… OSX 10.6 “Snow Leopard” was the first version of OSX that had CalDAV and CardDAV syncing built in (both needed for iCloud syncing), but the implementation is not as smooth as in OSX 10.7 “Lion”… [ note : OSX 10.5 “Leopard” could only import CalDAV and CardDAV data, there was no syncing ]

But I’ve done som research and I think I’m very, very close to the solution now… [ the only problem is I don’t own a Core Duo Mac myself anymore, so I’m a little crippled regarding testing… ] Some people report being successful using the method outlined below, others – like me – are close, but don’t have things running yet…

Try this method, and please report back on your findings, so we can work out a solution that works for everybody :

–1– find your iCloud Server-number and your 9-digit iCloud Account-code :

How to find your iCloud server and 9-digit iCloud user code :

– on your Mac, go to http://www.icloud.com
– login using your AppleID e-mail address and AppleID password
– click on Calendar
– the online calendar layout now opens
– now go to Window (in the upper menu bar) –> Activity
– in Activity window that opens you’ll find the text “iCloud Calendar” in bold letters, just below it, you’ll find 3 lines that look like this :

http://icloud.com
https://p0X-contacts.icloud.com/123456789/wcs/xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
https://p0X-contactws.icloud.com/co/mecard/?dsid=123456789&id=yyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy

– remember that p0X-prefix and the 123456789-code ! you are going to need those in the following steps !

(the p0X-prefix is your iCloud Server-number, and the 123456789-code is your 9-digit iCloud Account-code)

–2– Repair Disk Permissions

– open Programs –> Utilities –> Disk Utility

– select your internal hard drive’s main partition (the one you have MacOSX running on) form the list on the left

– select the ‘First Aid’-tab

– click on “Repair Disk Permissions”

…and wait for it to finish

–3– turn on iCloud Calendar syncing :

– open iCal on your Mac

– go to iCal –> Preferences

– in the window that opens, click on the ‘Accounts’-tab

– click on the ‘+’-button

– in the ‘Add Account’-window that opens, select “Account Type: CalDAV”

– at ‘E-mail address:’ type your AppleID-account’s login eMail address

– at ‘Password:’ type your AppleID password

– at ‘Server address:’ type “p0X-caldav.icloud.com”

(in which the p0X-prefix should correspond with the p0X-prefix you’ve found in step 1)

– then click the ‘Create’-button

– the iCloud CalDAV account you’ve just created will now be listed on the left

– in the ‘Account info’-tab, at ‘Description:’ type “iCloud Calendar sync”

– at ‘Calendar synchronization:’ select “Every minute” (or any other option, but do not select “Push”) [ I’m not certain on this one… but it’s my best guess for now… ]

– leave the rest as it is set automatically

– then select the ‘Server settings’-tab, make sure that ‘Use SSL’ is checked

– leave the ‘Port:’ setting empty (it will display “Automatic” in grey) ; if that doesn’t work you might try setting it to “443”

– put a check mark in front of “Use SSL”

– do NOT put a check mark in front of “Use Kerberos” [ I’m not certain on this one… but it’s my best guess for now… ]

– note : the 9-digit number from the Server Path is your 9-digit iCloud Account code ! 

– exit the iCal Preferences by clicking on the little red button in the upper left corner

–4– prepare Address Book and iCloud Contacts for syncing :

– open Address Book on your Mac

– IMPORTANT : now delete any profile pictures from ALL your contacts, as these will create unwanted duplicates when syncing [ that’s right… everything comes with a price… ] and remember to never use new profile pictures until you stop using MacOSX 10.6 ‘Snow Leopard’

– now drag the group (from the list on the left) called “All contacts” (might also be called “On My Mac”) to the desktop of your Mac to create a backup called “All contacts.vcf”

– go online to http://www.icloud.com

– login using your AppleID and password

– then select “Contacts”

– then select all contacts by selecting just one and then pressing the [CMD] + [A] keys on your keyboard at the same time

– then click on the ‘gearing wheel’-icon (a.k.a. ‘sprocket’-icon) in the lower left corner and choose “Delete” from the popup list

– in the ‘Are You sure?’-window that opens, click on “Delete”

– now your iCloud contacts list will be completely empty

– click on the ‘gearing wheel’-icon (a.k.a. ‘sprocket’-icon) in the lower left corner and choose “Import vCard…”

– in the pulldown window that opens, got to your Desktop folder to select the “All contacts.vcf” file you have previously created, and click “Select”

– then wait for all contacts to import…

– when it all imported, select the iCloud button in the upper left corner to return to the main iCloud page and click ‘Log out” in the upper right corner

– then on your Mac, go to Address Book

– select on of your contacts and then press the [CMD] + [A] keys on your keyboard at the same time to select them all

– then press the ‘backspace’-key (a.k.a. ‘backwards delete’) on your keyboard and click on “Delete” to confirm deletion of all your contact

– now your contacts list will be completely empty

REMEMBER : do not add any profile pictures ever again to any of your contacts !

–5– turn on iCloud Contacts syncing :

– then on your Mac, go to Address Book –> Preferences

– in the window that opens, click on the ‘Accounts’-tab

– click on the ‘+’-button

– in the ‘Add Account’-window that opens, select “Account Type: CardDAV”

– at ‘User Name:’ type your AppleID-account’s login eMail address

– at ‘Password:’ type your AppleID-account’s password

– at ‘Server address:’ type “p0X-contacts.icloud.com” (with p0X according to your previously found iCloud server prefix)

– click “Create”

– despite the warning that the account settings couldn’t be fetched, click on “Create” again

– then quit Address Book immediately, by pressing the small red button in the upper left corner, and clicking on Address Book –> Quit Address Book from the menu bar

[ Note : quitting Address Book is a very important step in the setup process ! ]

– now in the Finder go to Users –> [your user home folder] –> Library –> Application Support –> Address Book –> Sources –> [folder with an enormous alphanumeric name] –> Configuration.plist

– right-click ( a.k.a. [CTRL]+[mouse click] ) on this Configuration.plist file and select “Open using…” –> “Textedit” from the popup list

– then in Textedit, find the following line :

<string>http://:0(null)</string&gt;

– change it to this :

<string>http://:p0X-contacts.icloud.com/123456789/carddavhome/addressbook</string&gt;

(with p0X according to your previously found iCloud server prefix, and 123456789 according to your 9-digit number from the iCal-CalDAV Server Path)

– then two lines below you will find the following line :

<string>yourname@me.com</string>

(in which “your name@me.com” is the eMail address that you use as your AppleID iCloud login)

– change it to this :

<string>yourname%40me.com:password</string>

(with the “@”-sign being replaced by “%40” and “password” being your AppleID iCloud password)

– then select File –> Save and exit Textedit

– now open Configuration.plist again in Textedit to see if the changes were properly saved, and if so, exit Textedit

– then open Address Book and go to Address Book –> Preferences

– select the ‘Accounts’-tab

– select CardDAV from the list on the left

– select the ‘Account info’-tab

– at ‘Description:’ type “iCloud Contacts syncing”

– at ‘User Name:’ type “your name%40me.com:password” (exactly the way you’ve typed it in the Configuration.plist file previously)

– at ‘Password:’ type ” ” (just a single space)

– then select the ‘Server settings’-tab

– at ‘Server address:’ type “p0X-contacts.icloud.com”

(with p0X according to your previously found iCloud server prefix)

– at ‘Server path:’ you won’t be able to change anything, but it should be a “/”, then your 9-digit code, followed by “/carddavhome/addressbook” or “/principal/” or “/carddavhome/” [ I’m not certain on this one… but it’s my best guess for now… ]

– at ‘Port:’ type “443”

– and add a check mark next to “Use SSL” (try “don’t use SSL” also…) [ I’m not certain on this one… but it’s my best guess for now… ]

As mentioned before : this is is said to work for some, but not for all !
Some testing still needs to be done, mainly on these points :
– Calendar Synchronisation : which setting is needed here is not clear, it might be that “Push” will not work
– it is not clear whether “Kerberos” should be used or not in the Calendar settings
– various partial solutions I’ve read do not agree on the path to use for iCloud contacts, but it is probably one of these three :
p0X-contacts.icloud.com/[your 9-digit code]/principal/
p0X-contacts.icloud.com/[your 9-digit code]/carddavhome/
p0X-contacts.icloud.com/[your 9-digit code]/carddavhome/addressbook/
(and in all of them, it might even work better to omit the last slash-sign…)
– one would expect that SSL should be used on both Calendar and Contacts syncing, but that’s not clear either, it might be needed for only one of them, or maybe even for neither…
And there’s one other thing that might be problematic also (maybe because OSX 10.6 “Snow Leopard” was originally only designed to do MobileMe-syncing) :
– things might not work for any iCloud-login name that is not a …@me.com-eMail address
So… please report back here on your findings !
Thank you !

Special thanks to Egg Freckles and Wimbledon Sound, for directing me towards using the iCloud settings for the iPhone 3G for iCloud integration to Snow Leopard

their partial solutions were originally posted here :

http://eggfreckles.net/notes/bringing-icloud-to-snow-leopard/

http://www.wimbledonsound.com/icloud-snow-leopard-calendar-and-address-book-sync-fix/