fixed : using a Nintendo Switch on an HD-ready TV without HDMI-input

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the solution outlined below is your best option for all devices that have an HDMI port as their best or only video output, including (but not limited to) gaming consoles like Playstation PS3/PS4, Xbox 360 & Xbox One, Nintendo Switch & Wii-U and all versions of AppleTV

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Question :

I just bought a Nintendo Switch gaming console and I want to connect it to my old flatscreen 26″ LCD-TV that doesn’t have HDMI.

Even tough the TV is able to display HD-video up to 1080i and computer-display resolutions up to 1280×768 pixels at 60Hz, it does not have an HDMI input, neither a digital audio input (a.k.a. “Toslink”).

The only input options are :

– DVI digital video + 3.5mm (a.k.a. “jack”) analog audio

– VGA analog video + 3.5mm (a.k.a. “jack”) analog audio

– Component YPbPr analog video + stereo analog audio (5 plugs, a.k.a. “RCA” or “tulip”)

– S-video analog video (S-video plug) + stereo analog audio (a.k.a. “RCA” or “tulip”)

– SCART analog video + audio (SCART plug)

How do I connect my Nintendo Switch to this TV-set ?

 

Answer :

Even though it might seem the most obvious to connect the Nintendo Switch’s HDMI-output to the TV’s DVI-input, since HDMI and DVI are 100% video-compatible, this comes with 2 problems :

– DVI has no audio, so you will have to connect the audio separately ; in this case that would require a DAC (digital-analog-converter) for your audio since your TV has no digital audio input

– DVI does not support HDCP-encryption as HDMI does, so any ‘copyright-protected’ HDMI content will be blocked when connected to DVI…

So… do not try to use the DVI-input, but use the Component YPbPr connection, especially since the digital-to-analog video-conversion gets rid of the HDCP-limitations for you also !

This converter cable is the most elegant option that will do the trick for you :

LogiLink HDMI to YPbPr & Audio Converter Cable (2m) [Amazon.com]

LogiLink HDMI to YPbPr & Audio Converter Cable (2m) [Amazon.co.uk]

LogiLink HDMI to YPbPr & Audio Converter Cable (2m) [Amazon.de]

…it turns out that the HDMI-output of the Nintendo Switch is supplying enough power to  power the built-in converter, so you don’t need to connect the USB-power cable.

Donate Button (MacManusNL)

 

If you have an HD-Ready flatscreen TV and you want to connect an AppleTV or a gaming console (Nintendo Wii-U, Nintendo Switch, Playstation PS3/PS4, Xbox One or Xbox 360), your best option is to use the HDMI-to-YPbPr converter-cable mentioned above.

But… in some cases these might also be interesting :

An HDMI-to-VGA&stereo converter-cable :

LogiLink HDMI to VGA & Audio Converter Cable (2m) [Amazon.com]

LogiLink HDMI to VGA & Audio Converter Cable (2m) [Amazon.co.uk]

LogiLink HDMI to VGA & Audio Converter Cable (2m) [Amazon.de]

An HDMI-to-HDMI&stereo converter-cable : [so this splits the audio from the HDMI-video signal and converts it into a separate analog stereo (2x RCA) signal, but beware that the output video signal is 720p, 1080p and 1080i only, which is problematic for most HD-ready flatscreen TVs, especially when combined with an HDMI-to-DVI converter] :

LogiLink HDMI to HDMI & Analog Audio Converter Cable (2m) [Amazon.co.uk]

LogiLink HDMI to HDMI & Analog Audio Converter Cable (2m) [Amazon.de]

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info : streaming just one DVD to 2 iPads at the same time

Question :

I would like to watch a DVD on my iPad (without having to convert the DVD), but… as I have 2 children, I would even prefer to enable them to both have their own iPad/iPhone and watch the same DVD.

Is there any solution to do so ?

Answer :

This can be done by steaming a DVD to your iPhone/iPad. There are several options to do so, but one of the most interesting ones I’ve found requires a WiFi DVD player.

The smallest WiFi DVD player I’ve found is the Samsung Optical SmartHub SE-208BW :

Samsung Optical SmartHub SE-208BW

(The SE-208BW has several intended uses, it can be a WiFi-router, or a DVD-burner for netbooks, or a wireless DVD streamer, media streamer or 1-click back-up for iOS or Android devices, for instance…)

To use it with an iOS (or Android) device like an iPhone or iPad, you will also need the FREE SmartHub app :

https://itunes.apple.com/en/app/mobile-smarthub/id483986474?mt=8

– plug the SE-208BW into the wall power

– open the DVD-tray by pressing the small button on the front

– put in a movie-DVD

– close the DVD-tray

– on your iPhone/iPad, go to Settings, then in Wi-Fi, find the SE-208BW’s WiFi-network and connect to it (note : the name and password of the WiFi-network are indicated on the bottom of the SE-208BW, the name of the WiFi-network will be something like “208BWxxxx”)

– open the SmartHub-app (*)

– if you get a “Turn on WiFi first” connection error (or if the two rings in the WiFi-icon top-right are not chained), just exit the app, go to Settings and reconnect to the SmartHub’s WiFi-network

– then click on the green rectangle marked “DVD Player”

– now the “DVD Server List” opens ; the screen will be mainly black at first and then show the “Smart Hub Server”

– then open the SmartHub-app on your second iPhone/iPad also, click the green “DVD Player” rectangle, and wait for the “Smart Hub Server” to appear in the “DVD Server List”

– then click “OK” on both the first and the second iPhone/iPad, and the DVD will start on both iDevices

…that’s it : you are now watching the DVD movie on both iPhones/iPads

Donate Button (MacManusNL)

note : even though you are watching one-and-the-same DVD on two ‘screens’ at the same time, they are NOT synchronous, so it’s best these things in mind :

– use headphones on both iPhones/iPads

– you have to pause the movie on each ‘screen’ (iPhone/iPad) separately

– using the FastForward and/or Reverse options during playback of a movie on both ‘screens’ will usually cause interference (like frame-scipping, unexpected halts or viewing quality decrease) on the other ‘screen’

(*) if you need to do any additional set-up on the SE-208BW you can do so from within the iOS-app

NOTE :

streaming only one DVD to 2 iPhones/iPads at the same time using the Samsung SmartHub tends to work okay, but chances you’ll see ‘halts to cache’ are rather high… so do not expect as flawless movie-viewing as you can get with a ‘regular’ (non-streaming, but wired) DVD-player

FYI :

I have found only one car adapter for the Optical SmartHub. More info can be found here :

5V 4A car adapter for Samsung Optical SmartHub SE-208BW

Old School Mac [4] : how to burn DVD-recordables that will play on any DVD-player

— THIS IS A REPOST FROM LONG WAY BACK ; JUST FOR ENTERTAINMENT — ORIGINALLY POSTED ON MACOSX.NL (a.k.a. ONE MORE THING) IN 2004

Question : If I upgrade to DVD Studio Pro, will that enable me to burn DVD-recordables that will play on any DVD-player ?

Answer : No. The difference between iDVD and DVD Studio Pro has (next to) nothing to do with compatibility with any DVD-player (neither hardware nor software)… too bad… If you like iDVD, use it to burn a DVD-R, and copy that onto a DVD+R on a Mac or PC that has a DVD+R-burner. That will hugely increase your chances on being able to play your DVD on stand-alone DVD-players (so upgrading from iDVD to Toast and a DVD+R-burner is a way better solution for this than upgrading to DVD Studio Pro)

Things that have most influence on compatibility of your DVD-recordables :

  • the difference between DVD-R and DVD+R (especially in case of older DVD-players)
  • how up-to-date is the hardware and/or software DVD-player ?
  • if you want optimal compatibility with stand-alone DVD-players (hardware) : choose DVD+R, that will be compatible in nearly 99% of the cases (DVD-R will only be compatible in about 60% of the cases)
  • do not use rewriteables like DVD+RW or DVD-RW, those will only be compatible with very recent hardware
  • burn your DVDs in UDF-format

If you want optimal compatibility with Windows PCs :

  • make sure your PC is up-to-date : install the latest firmware and /or drivers for the DVD-drive & use version 5 of the WinDVD software (version 4 is more problematic, but still way better than Windows Media Player)
  • use a regular movie-DVD you’ve bought in a store to test if your PC is capable of even  playing any DVDs (some business-PCs do have a DVD-drive and DVD-player software installed, but still can’t play movie-DVDs due to ‘odd’ pre-installed software permissions and bad drivers and/or firmware…)
  • choose DVD+R if you do not have any info on the Windows-PC that will be used, that will vastly increase your chances on good compatibility (if the PC is fully up-to-date, neither DVD+R or DVD-R will give any problems)
  • don’t burn onto DVD+RW or DVD-RW media
  • burn your DVDs in UDF-format
If you want optimal compatibility with Macs :
  • make sure your Mac is up-to-date : install the newest version of OSX (or OS9)
  • preferably choose DVD-R media (sometimes a Mac can read the data, but cannot play the video, just because OSX’s DVD Player software prefers DVD-R ; OSX is less compatible than OS9 in this regard)
  • you can use DVD+/-RW rewrite able media, but why would you ?
  • preferably burn you DVDs in UDF-format
Things that have little or no influence on compatibility [the experts do not agree with me on this, but my own extensive testing does not show any significant differences] :
  • the speed of burning (4x burning speed has just as strange burn-failures as 2.4x or 2x or 1x burning speed)
  • the retail price of the DVD+/-R media (renowned brands also have burn-failures)
In short : if the DVD-player (software and hardware) is not up-to-date, it still remains to be seen how compatible your burned DVDs are.
e.g. I had 4 DVD-Rs that I had tested to be good on my OSX-Mac, my old Philips DVD-player and my old WindowsMe-PC, so I expected them to work on a brand-new WindowsXP-laptop… boy was that a mistake : 3 of them were compatible, but 1 failed entirely, it was not recognised… but : of all DVDs that didn’t play in WindowsMe,  nearly half did play in WindowsXP without any problem… so there’s no logic to any of it…
So hoping to increasing compatibility by upgrading from iDVD to DVD Studio Pro is very, very doubtful…
Some interesting links :
there is a patch for iDVD4 that will enable you to (instead of buying to DVD-R) ‘burn’ to a disk image :
there is also a patch for iDVD3 somewhere on the internet, but I do not have a direct link – if you dare, you might try a search for something like “iDVD [no SuperDrive]” on the ‘doubtful download sites’…
Sizzle is an OSX-application that is said to do faster (and better) MPEG2-conversions than QuickTime (and therefore than iDVD) :
[I didn’t test this myself, because I have OSX 10.3…]
If you are looking for iDVD tutorials :
If you want to check the compatibility of any stand-alone DVD-player :
If you want to check the quality of DVD+/-R media :
If you would like to know about the nicest features of DVD Studio Pro :

the original post(s) can be found here :

http://forum.macosx.nl/community/topic/dvd-studio-pro-2-compatibiliteit